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Growing Grass From Seed

Growing Grass Seed in Maryland: Watering 101

You must maintain moisture;

if the seeds dry out, they will die.

How often should you water new grass seed?

You must maintain moisture; if the seeds dry out, they will die.  Water it for 5 to 10 minutes immediately after planting, gently moistening the first several inches of soil.

You must maintain moisture in the seeding area from this point on; if the seeds are allowed to dry out, they will die.

How often to water new grass seed really depends on the amount of rainfall your region gets after seeding.  If Maryland is not receiving any rainfall, you will want to water new grass seed twice per day until the top couple of inches of soil are moist.

What is the best time of day to water new grass seed?

The best time to water grass seed is in the morning and evening.  These are the coolest parts of the day, which allows the ground to absorb the water instead of the water evaporating.

How to water new grass seed depends on the area you have seeded . Large areas can benefit from the use of a quality rectangular sprinkler.  Use a small spot sprinkler for smaller seeded areas. 

A water timer can simplify the watering process, so you can care for your newly seeded lawn easily and efficiently.

How long should you water new grass seed?

How long to water new grass seed depends on your soil conditions and your sprinkler setup.  In general, ten minutes of watering per session (morning and evening) will provide enough water to keep the top couple of inches of soil moist.

As your new grass seed grows and flourishes, you can water more deeply and less frequently – this will encourage established grass roots to extend deeply into the soil.

When watering grass seedlings, gradually increase morning watering sessions over time, while decreasing evening watering.  Eventually, you’ll want to water between 6 and 10 am, while the weather is still cool.  An established lawn typically requires about 1 inch of water per week, including rainfall.

If your new seed was covered with a “straw mat” erosion netting, it is intended for that netting to remain in place permanently.  The new seed will germinate through the straw mat and become part of the thatch of the new turf.  Attempting to pull the straw mat up will rip the tender blades of grass out by the root and destroy your newly germinated lawn.  Corners and seams of the straw mat can be trimmed with scissors or a utility knife if they become a problem to mow around.

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